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The Top Seven of Pro-life Social Media – #7: 40 Days for Life

November 9th, 2013 · 2 Comments

Molly Sheahan, a Junior studying Communication Arts: Multimedia at Franciscan University of Steubenville, shares about Pro-Life organizations that use social media effectively.

Social media is best price for generic cialis a treasure trove for the pro-life movement. In fact, the Pew Research Center reported in August of buy cialis tadalafil this year that 72% of the United States population uses social networks, including an astonishing 89% of young adults aged 18-29. If we want to reach Americans, we need to do so online.

We live in a digital age with rapid communications, memes, and yes, online birthday cards. Effective social media strategy is paramount to levitra free sample keep an audience involved. Luckily, the pro-life movement is stepping up their use of digital media to reach the youth.

As someone who has been actively involved with the pro-life movement online since age 12, and as someone who simply spends way too much time on Facebook, I follow a lot of pro-life groups on cheap cialis australia social networks. Although there are many, many successful pro-life groups online, I chose these 7 organizations because they use multiple social networks, reach the widest audience, and mobilize the most people.

So, I give you the first of my top seven of the pro-life new media movement …

7. 40 Days for Life
One of the first pro-life organizations to adopt new media was 40 Days for Life, a prayer campaign that invites people to pray in front of abortion facilities. Begun in 2004, when social networks were still in their infancy (and dinosaurs still roamed the invens.nl internet), the founders of click now 40 Days for Life used whatever digital media they had.

They communicated with potential city campaign leaders online through their website and via email, and hosted webcasts to train their volunteers. Since its founding, an amazing 575,000 people in nineteen countries have participated in 40 Days for Life! Their success would not have been possible without digital media.

Read through my posts and share about these or other Pro-life individuals and www.toyota-motorsport.com organizations that are using social media effectively. Our conversation will be found in the Comments for this and other posts.

→ 2 CommentsTags: Guest Writer · New Media · Pro-Life Communication · Social Media

The Top Seven of Pro-life Social Media – #6: Priests for Life

November 7th, 2013 · 2 Comments

Molly Sheahan, a Junior studying Communication Arts: Multimedia at Franciscan University of Steubenville, is sharing about Pro-Life organizations that use social media effectively.

We live in a digital age with rapid communications, memes, and yes, online birthday cards. Effective social media strategy is paramount to keep an audience involved. Luckily, the pro-life movement is stepping up their use of digital media to reach the youth.

The number six pro-life organization using social networks is …

6. Priests for Life
If you’ve ever tried running a Facebook page, you know that it’s hard work to keep pages updated and fans interested simultaneously. Priests for Life, a Catholic pro-life religious order that works in conjunction with their family of pro-life affiliations, manages to keep their fans happy and their pages active at the same time. This is all while running not one, not two, but seventeen active pro-life Facebook pages!

These diverse pages are aimed at youth, minorities, professed religious, post-abortive women and men, and the average Joe. Priests for Life caters to pridefest.com a very broad demographic. To help their older volunteers use social media, they have even written a handbook with guidelines on how to use Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. These valiant efforts definitely deserve a spot in this list.

Did you know that Priests for Life reached out to such a wide audience? How effective do you think their use of social media is among the different people in its audience? Share your thoughts in the Comments section.

→ 2 CommentsTags: Guest Writer · New Media · Pro-Life Communication · Social Media

Connecting the Media and the Church

November 5th, 2013 · 7 Comments

This guest post was written by Miriam McDonnel, a student at Franciscan University of Steubenville.

The new millennial generation is a private generation compared to their priors, meaning that unlike other generations; they do not have to physically be with someone to talk to them. How does this mindset affect the church one may ask? Because the new millennial are losing their sense of tradition and if there is not some innovative reason to http://www.umlauf.de/viagra-online-no-prescription why they should attend mass on Sunday morning and stop browsing their newsfeed on Facebook, then they most likely will not be at mass that morning. They are absorbed in the world of technology and viagra canada online are not leaving thus if the church were to become innovative with how they interact with young teens, they may turn this tide while there is still time.

In the 1950s, seventy-five percent of people on average attended church regularly. Church was a valuable time for people to receive peace, comfort, and spiritual guidance and in particular, socialize with their neighbors. Most parents were in some way active with the organizations of the church and thus most likely brought their children with them. However, with each generation the viagra sale cheap number of church goers is voorlezendoetgoed.nl decreasing and therefore children are increasingly becoming less involved with the church. Around two-thirds of buy viagra generic adults still go to church because that is how they were raised and the percentage is decreasing each generation. According to The Church and the New Media by Brandon Vogt, only fifteen percent of young adults attend church regularly in modern society. [Read more →]

→ 7 CommentsTags: Catholic Church · Guest Writer · New Media · Social Communications · Social Media

The Top Seven of Pro-life Social Media – #5: Stand True

November 5th, 2013 · 5 Comments

Molly Sheahan, a Junior studying Communication Arts: Multimedia at Franciscan University of Steubenville, is sharing about Pro-Life organizations that use social media effectively.

We live in a digital age with rapid communications, memes, and yes, online birthday cards. Effective social media strategy is paramount to keep an audience involved. Luckily, the pro-life movement is stepping up their use of digital media to reach the youth.

The number five pro-life organization using social networks is …

5. Stand True
This marvelous group is Priests for Life’s youth outreach arm, but they deserve their own spot on the list for their superhuman ability to mobilize the youth. Utilizing Facebook events, Twitter hashtags, and digital posters, Stand True collaborates with other pro-life organizations to orchestrate some of the most fun pro-life events of the year.

For example, October 15th was the 2013 Pro-life Day of Silent Solidarity and a staggering 862 schools signed up. Let’s be honest. Organizing a group of teens to get to a coffee shop is hard enough, but to http://invens.nl/where-to-find-levitra get so many pro-life youngsters to give up their voices for the voiceless is a real feat!

Add to the conversation by sharing your thoughts about using social media to mobilize people for the Pro-life cause in the Comments section.

→ 5 CommentsTags: Guest Writer · New Media · Pro-Life Communication · Social Media

From Cradle to Trust

November 4th, 2013 · 25 Comments

This guest post was written by Rebecca Siemens, a student at Franciscan University of Steubenville.

When we hear the term “cradle Catholic” many of us have a stereotypical image of that term in our brains. It brings to mind those people who have been around the faith their whole life, who have been to church every Sunday for as long they can remember, and who don’t have those striking conversion stories that the majority of cialis official website the rest of the Catholic population has. But is this true? Do those of us who are cradle Catholic simply have no story to tell? Do we stereotype ourselves with this term and, even worse, do we put ourselves in a box, disallowing ourselves to grow in our faith?

I have to say the cialis order 5 mg answer is probably yes, for the majority of cradle Catholics. And it is understandable to buy cialis viagra see why this is so. We were most likely taught about the faith before we learned the alphabet thus making it seem that we know everything there is to know about the Catholic faith by the time we reach high school or college. And even though we think we are professionals on the topic of Catholicism doesn’t mean we are professionals on the topic of God. For it is when He steps in that we question if we ever did live out our “cradle faith” to the fullest.

And that is exactly what happened to me.
[Read more →]

→ 25 CommentsTags: Catholic Faith · Guest Writer